Music maker – Ringtones Download http://ringtonesdownload.net/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 17:24:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ringtonesdownload.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-100x100.png Music maker – Ringtones Download http://ringtonesdownload.net/ 32 32 5 Other Bay Area Food Halls You Can’t Miss https://ringtonesdownload.net/5-other-bay-area-food-halls-you-cant-miss/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 16:10:42 +0000 https://ringtonesdownload.net/5-other-bay-area-food-halls-you-cant-miss/ If you haven’t been to the food halls of the Bay Area lately, you’re in for a treat. There are new restaurants, new cocktails and, in some cases, music and summer activities. Here are five of our favorites: Market & Main, Martinez Inside the brick walls of this downtown venue, you’ll find a small but […]]]>

If you haven’t been to the food halls of the Bay Area lately, you’re in for a treat. There are new restaurants, new cocktails and, in some cases, music and summer activities. Here are five of our favorites:

Market & Main, Martinez

Inside the brick walls of this downtown venue, you’ll find a small but well-rounded selection of vendors: East Bay Artisan, offering breads, sandwiches and pastas; Craft & Fire, a bar with artisanal pizzas; Moroccan Coffee Mamounia; the Shuck It! oyster bar; TL Custom Cakes; as well as fresh produce. Soon a new stand, Banh Mi & Rolls.

Details: 610 Market Street, Martinez; www.marketandmainmartinez.com

Castro Valley Market

They have the butcher (Barons), baker (Seven Hills), and sushi maker (Akemi), as well as Oculto, the Cannery Kitchen & Tap, Castro Valley Natural Grocery, Cordial Cellar & Lounge, and Night Owl. Niche specialists include Amphora Nueva Olive Oil Works and Oaktown Spice Shop. Check the website for the schedule of concerts and other events this summer.

Details: 3295 Castro Valley Blvd., Castro Valley; www.castrovalleymarketplace.com

San Pedro Square Market, San José

A tequila bar, the Alma Tequileria, has joined Hyland Sushi, Jora Peruvian, Urban Momo, Loteria, Pasta Fresca, Hella Good Burger, Three Sisters and the rest of the food and drink gang at this downtown market constantly evolving. This summer, the market will feature live music five nights a week, Wednesday through Sunday, in the expansive courtyard, and Kavaia Tea will appear on Saturdays.

The San Pedro Square Market in San Jose attracts passers-by with its mix of markets and restaurants. (Dai Sugano/Bay Area News Group)

Details: 87 N. San Pedro St., San Jose; www.sanpedrosquaremarket.com

State Street Market, Los Altos

This peninsula food hall has been busy since opening in September with four restaurants (Ostro, Murdoch’s, Banks & Braes, Grains & Greens). Celebrity chef Traci Des Jardin’s El Alto debuted in the courtyard, and Little Blue Door, Bao Bei and Tin Pot Creamery joined the picture in the main building. There is a farmer’s market on Thursday afternoons and an on-site cooking class program.

Details: 170 State St., Los Altos; www.statestreetmarket.com

Ferry Building Marketplace, San Francisco

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NOLA teams up with local makers to launch limited edition whiskey • Glam Adelaide https://ringtonesdownload.net/nola-teams-up-with-local-makers-to-launch-limited-edition-whiskey-glam-adelaide/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 16:24:57 +0000 https://ringtonesdownload.net/nola-teams-up-with-local-makers-to-launch-limited-edition-whiskey-glam-adelaide/ To share Tweeter To share To share E-mail In 2018, NOLA partnered with The Exchange as part of its whiskey program, sourcing and collecting casks from the ex-Seppeltsfield port. Over the past few years, NOLA has aged spirits from various distilleries in these seasoned barrels, behind NOLA’s back bar and in the underground cellars of […]]]>

In 2018, NOLA partnered with The Exchange as part of its whiskey program, sourcing and collecting casks from the ex-Seppeltsfield port.

Over the past few years, NOLA has aged spirits from various distilleries in these seasoned barrels, behind NOLA’s back bar and in the underground cellars of The Stag Public House.

Now, after years of patience, they are ready to release them into the world. Each of these whiskeys is completely unique, like no other in the world. The location of the age, size and origin of the barrels and the distillation of the spirits all contributed to the finished products.

When NOLA decided to launch this program, they wanted to create a series of whiskeys that were each impacted by our sites. From every song our artists played to every person who walked through our doors, it all had an effect on the final product.

“People have been playing with how whiskey ages with temperature and sound for many years,” says venue owner Oliver Brown.

“The distillers have played music and sonic sounds to make the whiskey vibrate, so it has a different feel to the wood, which makes it age faster.”

NOLA has always been about supporting the little guy, so to bring this limited release to life, they brought in four local creatives. They paired each of these unique whiskeys with a local artist or maker, encouraging them to create a label that embodies their own unique style, while capturing the essence of whiskey itself and, of course, the spirit of NOLA and of New Orleans.

As part of this limited edition whiskey you will find labels created by Dave Court for Single Malt Whiskey from Tin Shed Distillery Co, Vans the Omega for Single Malt Whiskey from The McLaren Vale Distillery, Stuff by Glad for NOLA’s American Blend , and Yeah Dope for American Blend by NOLA.

Venue Manager Jamie Fraser says: “Reflecting on the past 4 years, a great deal of time and care has gone into developing our four whiskeys in a way that has brought out the best in each.

“Each whiskey has been treated uniquely and carefully (and with great care), with tastings taking place every 6 months to monitor progress and make any necessary changes while they rest. We had a lot of fun producing these whiskeys – we’re sure you’ll enjoy them too.

Nola is a New Orleans-inspired bar and restaurant located in the heart of Adelaide, with a focus on soulful Creole and Cajun cuisine. They believe in supporting the little guy and seek to tell their story and promote their products.

In love with high quality products, they aim to sell them and share them with others. Over time, NOLA has learned the importance of its impact on the environment and strives to create a minimal impact business in all areas. Throughout it all remains the humble New Orleans mantra, “let the good times roll!”

To purchase NOLA’s whiskey series, click here.

NOLA is located at 28 Vardon Ave, Adelaide SA 5000




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NMPA sends ‘formal notices’ to Google and Apple in app crackdown https://ringtonesdownload.net/nmpa-sends-formal-notices-to-google-and-apple-in-app-crackdown/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 23:15:07 +0000 https://ringtonesdownload.net/nmpa-sends-formal-notices-to-google-and-apple-in-app-crackdown/ NMPA President and CEO David Israelite. The National Music Publishers’ Association (NMPA) has officially targeted around 100 apps that it claims use unlicensed music – in addition to sending “formal notices” to the owner of the Google Play Store and the owner of the ‘Apple App Store,’ demanding responsibility for this problem. The effort to […]]]>

NMPA President and CEO David Israelite.

The National Music Publishers’ Association (NMPA) has officially targeted around 100 apps that it claims use unlicensed music – in addition to sending “formal notices” to the owner of the Google Play Store and the owner of the ‘Apple App Store,’ demanding responsibility for this problem.

The effort to curb the allegedly unauthorized use of music in apps – and to get Google and Apple to act – was revealed yesterday, in a speech by the president and CEO of National Music Publishers ‘ Association, David Israelite.

Speaking at the NMPA’s annual meeting in New York, Israelite highlighted the earnings of songwriters and publishers in the United States in 2021, discussed his organization’s “legal reimbursements” and reiterated agreements reached l year with Twitch and Roblox after high profile clashes.

“Today, we’re announcing a new initiative that targets the use of unlicensed music by apps or apps that run on mobile devices, such as phones, tablets, and watches,” Israelite continued. “Earlier today, the NMPA, on behalf of seven representative publishers, filed a lawsuit in federal court for the Northern District of California against an app known as Vinkle.”

(Vinkle, described on the Play Store as “an amazing video maker for beginners to video editing,” did not respond to a request for comment in time for publication.)

“Also today, the NMPA sent cease and desist letters to nearly 100 apps that use music without proper licenses,” Israelite continued after outlining Vinkle’s operational specifics. “Now the responsibility for licensing music is not limited to the app companies themselves. The app stores that license these apps also have a responsibility to ensure that the apps they make available to their customers are legal and not infringing.

“It is all the more important that these application stores are also managed by companies that offer music services, and that they benefit from the availability of these applications”, continued Israélite, whose group has come under heavy criticism in recent months. “So today, in addition to the lawsuit that was filed and the cease and desist letters that were sent to the apps themselves, the NMPA sent formal notices to Apple and Google demanding the responsibility for this problem.”

Later in his speech, the 17-year-old Israelite leader of the NMPA made it clear that he intended to curb the allegedly unauthorized use at hand as soon as possible.

“As with our gaming initiative a year ago, we expect to see rapid results from this new initiative,” he said. “There’s a reason the NMPA has never lost a case and why our enforcement efforts have netted over a billion dollars. If you are an application that uses music illegally, you can do the right thing to resolve your transgressions and become a legitimate business partner, or you can close. There is no other choice.”

To entice app developers to embrace the first option — and the associated payments — the NMPA also unveiled a “strategic partnership” with Songclip, a music integration platform that signed a deal with Universal Music three days ago. Group. Additionally, Israelite highlighted “a strategic partnership with the ACT Association, which is a trade association representing the app developer community.”

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Producer and engineer Leanne Ungar talks about Leonard Cohen’s recording, accessibility and his unique studio touch https://ringtonesdownload.net/producer-and-engineer-leanne-ungar-talks-about-leonard-cohens-recording-accessibility-and-his-unique-studio-touch/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 22:17:50 +0000 https://ringtonesdownload.net/producer-and-engineer-leanne-ungar-talks-about-leonard-cohens-recording-accessibility-and-his-unique-studio-touch/ In the grooves of a record, some producers announce their presence loud and clear. Daniel Lanois looks like Daniel Lanois. Georges Martin looked like George Martin. Eno is Eno is Eno. Other headlights, like Rick Rubinpractice a kind of voluntary transparency and distance to let the artist himself be the most authentic. Then think of […]]]>

In the grooves of a record, some producers announce their presence loud and clear. Daniel Lanois looks like Daniel Lanois. Georges Martin looked like George Martin. Eno is Eno is Eno. Other headlights, like Rick Rubinpractice a kind of voluntary transparency and distance to let the artist himself be the most authentic.

Then think of Leanne Ungar, who produced and designed some of the most eminent artists of the 20th century. Where does it fall on this spectrum? “I think different kinds of music call for different kinds of sounds,” Ungar told GRAMMY.com. “Some have buried voices; some have the greatest voice you’ve ever heard. I wanted to be able to do both.”

Having both senses in the engineer’s chair doesn’t mean that Ungar somehow lacks a distinct identity; in fact, it means the opposite. By serving the song above all, Ungar fulfills the highest vocation of a producer and/or an engineer: to bring music into the consciousness of a listener by the purest and most free way.

Where does this philosophy come from? “What goes with my personality is that I’ve always tried to be as invisible as possible,” Ungar continues. “So when I come back and listen to records that I’ve made over time, it’s quite changeable. It’s more in service of the artist and the song.”

Read on for an in-depth interview with Ungar about what inspired her to become a producer and engineer, how she honed her distinctive approach, and what she wants to bring out in any artist, regardless of genre, style or style. the intention.

This interview has been edited for clarity.

I’m such a fan of these Leonard Cohen albums you co-designed. What was it like working on i am your man?

I was talking to a student the other day who told me he was working on a song called “I’m Your Man”. I said, “I recorded a song called ‘I’m Your Man!'” He had never heard of it, of course.

It was funny because the sense of humor seemed to be more present on this record than on some others. I took over in the middle; I didn’t save all the bases. It was produced by Roscoe Beck at the beginning, and at a certain point, he wanted to leave the project. I never really told him why.

I was traveling between working in New York and working in Los Angeles, and Leonard was in Los Angeles. It was just great to meet [oudist] John Bilezikjian and recording [vocalist] Jennifer Warnes. There was incredible talent on this record.

Leonard has always been hilarious, so I never quite understood how he came to prominence on this album.

Just looking at it with a wilted banana on the cover is so funny!

When did you first realize you were in the sounds of documents — their architecture more than what they contained?

There were a few things that happened to me after I walked into the studio and was bowled over by what was going on there and wanted to be a part of it. A few things that pushed me into engineering.

One was a sound company that worked with the grateful dead, called Still. Back then, in the late 60s, people weren’t even really using stacks of speakers and monitor speakers. The fact that they put so much into the concert sound told me sound was really important.

Then there was a disk called something anything by Todd Rundgren.

Such a fan!

Such a fantastic record. I noticed he was doing everything on it. He wrote; he sang; He produced; and he also recorded and mixed, which put it on the same level as the others. It meant a lot to me too.

Another key moment did not occur until 1976, when Stevie Wonderit is Songs in the key of life came out of. Surprising record, and a lot of those horns were synth horns, and they didn’t have reverb on them.

I was listening to this record, sitting there with a fellow assistant engineer, and we were just amazed that it could sound like this without having any reverb. I didn’t know how they did that, and it was wonderful.

I’m also a big fan of dry production.

I’m too! The reverberation is harsh. This blurs the recordings and puts a distance between you and the subject. It can also involve impact, so I think there are times when it has to be there.

But record on the dry side – especially those with depth, with something in front of your face but also behind the soundscape which is [dictating] the front or back of the room – are truly satisfying.

How did you fuse your various influences into a signature approach?

What goes with my personality is that I’ve always tried to be as invisible as possible. I don’t think the sound depends that much on the mixer. If you serve the song and it plays, I think that’s the most important thing.

So when I go back and listen to records I’ve made over time, it’s quite changeable. It is rather at the service of the artist and the song.

I like producers on both sides of the equation – those who are super transparent and those who put an unmistakable stamp on everything.

I think different kinds of music call for different kinds of sounds. Some have buried voices; some have the greatest voice you’ve ever heard. I wanted to be able to do both.

And being transparent involves more than just turning on the recorder and walking away. I am on apparent invisible requires a lot of subtle brushstrokes behind the scenes.

[Chuckles] I think you are right.

The way Leonard and [producer] John [Lissauer] worked on “Hallelujah” in the studio – there wasn’t a big budget for the record, and they had big ideas. One of the things they did a lot was use samples from the Synclavier [synthesizer]. We had to simulate a church space, a choir – different things that weren’t what they seemed.

So to serve this particular song, there had to be a lot of dynamics and depth to the “chorus” that was unfolding. So, I worked hard, I sweated, I tried to make it happen.

Leonard kept asking for more and more reverb in his voice. He wanted to sound like God on this particular point [song]. And I don’t think I did such a good job of simulating God, but there’s definitely a lot of reverb to it!

Listening to the first Leonard Cohens is interesting. They added some bells and whistles that didn’t really need to be there – but I like them!

He really didn’t like it!

When we went to make that Sony Legacy album [2022’s Hallelujah & Songs From His Albums]the first thing we thought of was to make the early tracks sound like the later ones, because some of the later sounds were fabulous.

So when we put that EQ on the first stuff, it brought up all these tambourines and bells and things that were all [Gestures, suggests a ceiling] here. Leonard said: “I fought the producer. I didn’t want it on the album. And now I don’t want it to be louder on the album. Make it boring!

His idea was very centered around the voice. And I think he always thought because he wasn’t a great quote-unquote singer – I think he has been a great singer in his own style — he always thought that if there was too much embellishment, people wouldn’t listen to him.

Give me a record you’ve worked on that you think sums up your vision.

Well, there’s this Holly Cole record that I really like – [1993’s] Don’t smoke in bed. It’s a jazz trio in Toronto — just piano, bass and vocals. It’s very, very simple, but it sounds pretty good and goes into different style machinations. It’s emotional, but not overdone. I love her so much.

I rented Shelley Yakus’ Telefunken 251 for vocals and it sounded fantastic! We also rented a Neve sidecar so we could get 1073 [channel amplifier/equalizer modules] on some entries.

We ended up not liking the piano too much because the pianist [Aaron Davis] had a way of touching the piano that sucked all the highs out of the sound. It was the smoothest, quietest piano sound I’ve ever heard, and it could make any piano sound like it.

Run that piano sound through the Neve pre[amp]s put too much fuzz and sweetness in the sound, so I ended up not using Neves on the piano.

It’s crazy how registration processes that would have cost a fortune 40 years ago are now available to almost anyone. What advice would you give to a young music creator who is just starting to play with sounds at home?

I think it’s wonderful that the sounds are there and can be had universally. It’s absolutely brilliant that you don’t have to walk into a million dollar studio. Although if you are looking for certain orchestral or drum sounds, it is good to have a processed acoustic environment.

For me, the most important thing is how you listen – what you hear. So, for me, mixing is above all hearing. Because hearing is so universal – we can’t stop sounds from coming in – we all think we hear everything, but we don’t.

One of the courses I’ve been teaching for 19 years now is critical listening. It’s about “What am I listening to? How can I go into a dense recording and listen to the things that were done that made it sound like that? What are the tools and how can- you tell them apart when you can’t solo something?”

I think mixing is very much about the relationship between this sound and that sound. I was talking about “front and back” earlier. The way textures sound next to each other. Not how they sound on their own or soloed, but how something bright can make something darker than it would on its own.

This is what you need to pay attention to and listen carefully. Mixing is tough whether you’re doing it in a million dollar studio or in your bedroom. I don’t think either is really more difficult if you know what you’re going to do.

Producer and engineer Susan Rogers worked with Prince and Barenaked Ladies. Now she wants to know why we love the music we make.

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Former Mattel set builder sues company for age discrimination | KFI AM 640 https://ringtonesdownload.net/former-mattel-set-builder-sues-company-for-age-discrimination-kfi-am-640/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://ringtonesdownload.net/former-mattel-set-builder-sues-company-for-age-discrimination-kfi-am-640/ TORRANCE (CNS) – A 69-year-old longtime Mattel set and set builder is suing the El Segundo-based toymaker, alleging he was forced to quit in 2021 because he couldn’t no longer tolerate a work environment in which his colleagues and supervisors berated him because of his age. Bernard Grisez lawsuit in Torrance Superior Court alleges wrongful […]]]>

TORRANCE (CNS) – A 69-year-old longtime Mattel set and set builder is suing the El Segundo-based toymaker, alleging he was forced to quit in 2021 because he couldn’t no longer tolerate a work environment in which his colleagues and supervisors berated him because of his age.

Bernard Grisez lawsuit in Torrance Superior Court alleges wrongful termination, age discrimination and harassment, failure to prevent harassment and discrimination, retaliation and intentional infliction of emotional distress . Grisez seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages.

A representative for Mattel could not immediately be reached for comment on the May 24 lawsuit.

“Throughout Mr. Grisez’s employment, his colleagues and supervisors at Mattel subjected him to a barrage of taunts and harassment, repeatedly asking him when he would retire, commenting on his age, calling him “old man”, saying he needed a walker to get around and posting hurtful images of him in the office,” the lawsuit alleges.

Grisez “find himself in an extremely toxic and hostile work environment where he was regularly berated, mocked and ridiculed by his peers and supervisors because of his age,” according to the lawsuit.

Grisez was directly employed by two recruitment agencies, Team Music and Knowledge Services Inc., which placed him with Mattel from May 2004 until his release last October, the lawsuit says. Knowledge Services is co-accused in the lawsuit.

In May 2004, Grisez, then 51, started working at Mattel as a part-time set builder, but two years later he and other set builders had to work full-time, says the trial.

Grisez managed Mattel’s set construction for some of the toy industry’s biggest trade shows and had significant responsibilities, including training newer and often younger employees, the lawsuit says.

Despite Grisez’s “exemplary work history and indisputable skills,” he was repeatedly passed over for promotion opportunities due to his age, according to the suit. Mattel instead offered promotions to younger employees with less experience, some of whom had been trained by the plaintiff, according to the suit.

In 2018, one of Mr. Grisez’s colleagues photographed the plaintiff’s face in the photo of veteran comedy actor Don Knotts with white hair who played an elderly, menial character on the television show “Three’s Company”, indicates the trial.

“This insulting and hurtful image was recorded in the public areas of Mattel’s office,” the lawsuit states.

When Grisez protested age discrimination to Mattel’s human resources, the company backed up its claims, the lawsuit says. But rather than take corrective action, Grisez was told he had to take less pay if he wanted to become a permanent employee, according to the lawsuit.

“Plaintiff was constructively terminated for refusing to accept these terms and conditions,” the suit states.

Mattel hired two 20-year-old employees in November to replace Grisez, the lawsuit says.

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Church to host “Dream Maker” in Mechanicsburg https://ringtonesdownload.net/church-to-host-dream-maker-in-mechanicsburg/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 00:50:55 +0000 https://ringtonesdownload.net/church-to-host-dream-maker-in-mechanicsburg/ MECHANICSBURG — Sonshine Productions will bring the original musical drama “Dream Maker” to Mechanicsburg as part of their upcoming summer tour. This performance will take place Thursday, June 23 at 7:30 p.m. in the sanctuary of the Mechanicsburg United Methodist Church. Sonshine Productions is a youth musical theater ministry rehearsing at Bethel International United Methodist […]]]>

MECHANICSBURG — Sonshine Productions will bring the original musical drama “Dream Maker” to Mechanicsburg as part of their upcoming summer tour. This performance will take place Thursday, June 23 at 7:30 p.m. in the sanctuary of the Mechanicsburg United Methodist Church.

Sonshine Productions is a youth musical theater ministry rehearsing at Bethel International United Methodist Church in Columbus. They produce original Broadway-style musicals based on Bible stories from the Old and New Testaments. Full costumes, props, lighting and sound, plus an exciting contemporary musical score, help bring these texts to life.

For more than four decades, young and adult actors have performed Sonshine musicals throughout Ohio and neighboring states. The organization has earned a reputation for excellence and strives for professionalism and spiritual integrity. Sonshine is led by founder and producer Mark Fox, who is Director of Music at Bethel International UMC, and recently retired as Director of Bands at Franklin Heights High School in Columbus.

This year they are staging “Dream Maker”, which is derived from the Old Testament story of Joseph, known for his dreams and coat of many colors. The dreams he has of God make him an outcast. After being sold into slavery by his jealous brothers, Joseph ascends to the governorship of Egypt and ultimately holds the fate of his brothers in his hands.

“Dream Maker” was written in 1990 by Reverend Timothy Forbess and Kevin Pike. The music was composed by Mark Fox, who added the following: “This show is very special for the 20 cast members of Sonshine 2022. This show has been taken to heart and we hope that the communities in which we will produce will find the enthusiastic performance to be inspiring.

“We are thrilled to have Sonshine back at Mechanicsburg,” said Matthew Smith, Music Director at Mechanicsburg UMC. “We hope that many faith groups and community members in the area will come to see this show, which showcases the hard work of these young people, as well as their resilience after so many cancellations over the past two years.”

Mechanicsburg United Methodist Church is located at 42 N. Main St., Mechanicsburg. Parking is available on the street and in the Race Street car park. The church is accessible to people with disabilities through the entrance closest to the car park.

The performance is free and open to the public, although a voluntary offering is collected to help offset expenses incurred by Sonshine Productions.

For more information about Mechanicsburg UMC or the performance, please contact the church by phone or Facebook: 937-834-2410 or facebook.com/mechanicsburgumc. More information about Sonshine Productions can be found at sonshineproductions.org.

Pictured is a scene from Sonshine Productions’ “Dream Maker” tour.

Info from Matthew Smith.

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Sony Music wants Bang Energy sanctioned in copyright row https://ringtonesdownload.net/sony-music-wants-bang-energy-sanctioned-in-copyright-row/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 21:13:00 +0000 https://ringtonesdownload.net/sony-music-wants-bang-energy-sanctioned-in-copyright-row/ By Jasmin Jackson (June 8, 2022, 5:13 PM EDT) – Sony Music has urged a federal court in Florida to sanction Bang Energy, alleging it deleted hundreds of social media videos at the center of the lawsuit Sony’s copyright over the music he claims was stolen and arguing the drinks maker failed to keep ‘critical […]]]>
By Jasmin Jackson (June 8, 2022, 5:13 PM EDT) – Sony Music has urged a federal court in Florida to sanction Bang Energy, alleging it deleted hundreds of social media videos at the center of the lawsuit Sony’s copyright over the music he claims was stolen and arguing the drinks maker failed to keep ‘critical evidence’.

Sony Music Entertainment argued in a spoliation penalty motion filed Tuesday that Vital Pharmaceuticals Inc. – commonly known as Bang Energy – caused it to lose “nearly three and a half months” by conferring about 252 allegedly infringing videos that the beverage maker apparently didn’t know. no longer had, at least in part.

Sony said it…

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LG’s latest Gram ultraportables feature 12th Gen Intel processors and screen privacy technology https://ringtonesdownload.net/lgs-latest-gram-ultraportables-feature-12th-gen-intel-processors-and-screen-privacy-technology/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 22:20:30 +0000 https://ringtonesdownload.net/lgs-latest-gram-ultraportables-feature-12th-gen-intel-processors-and-screen-privacy-technology/ Like many other PC makers, LG is gradually updating its laptop lineup with the latest processors from Intel and AMD. On Monday, the same day Apple announced its new , the company refreshed its Gram line of ultraportables with 12th Gen Intel Core processors. Gram LG To date, all six models in the family, including […]]]>

Like many other PC makers, LG is gradually updating its laptop lineup with the latest processors from Intel and AMD. On Monday, the same day Apple announced its new , the company refreshed its Gram line of ultraportables with 12th Gen Intel Core processors.

Gram LG

To date, all six models in the family, including the Gram 15 and the 14- and 16-inch Gram 2-in-1s, feature Intel’s new Alder Lake chips. Plus, you can now configure the laptops with up to 32GB of 5200MHz DDR5 RAM. Also new to the lineup is support for PCIe Gen 4 NVMe SSDs, with the whole family offering two slots for storage.

Apart from an internal spec bump, the most notable change to the Gram range is the addition of LG Glance, a display tool the company added with the help of Mirametrix. The technology enables a handful of new features. For starters, the laptop screen automatically locks when you walk away and blurs when the laptop notices someone looking at your screen over your shoulder. And if you connect an external display to one of LG’s new laptops, they’ll also automatically move your cursor to the screen you’re currently looking at, which seems incredibly shocking. You can see the Glance feature in action in the video below.

As before, the Grams come with 16:10 screens to give you a bit more screen real estate for productivity tasks. LG sticks to IPS panels across the range, with the standard models offering up to 350 nits of brightness and the 2-in-1s hitting 300 nits at maximum, but they feature a new anti-glare coating for less distracting reflections.

LG is also expanding the Gram lineup to include a portable 16-inch monitor. The 16MQ70 features a 2560 by 1600 resolution IPS panel with 99% coverage of the DCI-P3 color gamut, 16:10 aspect ratio and 1200 to 1 contrast ratio. You can buy it starting today for $350 from the company’s website. The updated Gram line of laptops is also available today, with the 15-inch model starting at $1,199 and the flagship 17-inch variant priced at $1,599 and up.

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Producer Katie Hartman affectionately welcomes more weirdos to the 19th Annual Cincinnati Fringe Festival | Theater | Cincinnati https://ringtonesdownload.net/producer-katie-hartman-affectionately-welcomes-more-weirdos-to-the-19th-annual-cincinnati-fringe-festival-theater-cincinnati/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 16:48:11 +0000 https://ringtonesdownload.net/producer-katie-hartman-affectionately-welcomes-more-weirdos-to-the-19th-annual-cincinnati-fringe-festival-theater-cincinnati/ Click to enlarge Photo: provided by the Cincinnati Fringe Festival Erika Kate MacDonald’s obsession with collapsing barns led her to create The identity of the barn. After two years supporting her quirky “Kinda Weird. Like You” A Cincinnati Fringe Festival tradition with mostly virtual presentations, the 19th annual Cincy Fringe returns June 3-18 with live, […]]]>
Click to enlarge

Photo: provided by the Cincinnati Fringe Festival

Erika Kate MacDonald’s obsession with collapsing barns led her to create The identity of the barn.

After two years supporting her quirky “Kinda Weird. Like You” A Cincinnati Fringe Festival tradition with mostly virtual presentations, the 19th annual Cincy Fringe returns June 3-18 with live, in-person and indoor productions. Artists from 15 US states, Washington DC and Australia will perform for two weeks on the Jackson Street stage of the Know Theater in Over-the-Rhine, as well as on the classroom stages of the nearby Art Academy of Cincinnati.

To give the festival new energy, Know Theater has hired Katie Hartman as Fringe Producer. Along with Nick Ryan, the Brooklyn-based singer, songwriter, actor and improviser is known to Cincinnati audiences as one of the Coldharts. Starting in 2014, they entertained rabid Cincy Fringe fans with a series of fearlessly dark shows: The Legend of White Woman Creek, Edgar Allan, Eddie Poe and The Unrepentant Necrophile. They called their works “designed musical theater inspired by American Gothic.”

How did Hartman go from performer to producer? She says CityBeat that when the pandemic halted performances in early 2020, she was initially grateful for a break from the Coldharts’ arduous touring schedule.

“When everything stopped and we were forced into quarantine, I didn’t feel the need to create anything new. I had the opportunity to reorient myself with my body, my practice, my life as a theater artist,” says Hartman. “I really have to prioritize the most important things. It’s become important to understand how to help others, to make it easier for other artists.

Like many, Hartman found herself at a crossroads during the COVID-19 pandemic and discussed options with a friend.

“I said, ‘If I had the chance, I would really like to do something like produce the Cincinnati Fringe Festival. I don’t want to reinvent the wheel. I don’t want to do my own festival. I really want to build something big in a place where it’s already established, where I can see how improvements could be made,” she recalls.

Four days later, Hartman received an email inquiry from Cincy Fringe organizers that mentioned the search for a new producer. Believing he had written the fastest cover letter ever, Hartman immediately replied, “Have you found this person yet? Because I want to apply.

“This is my dream job!” she says. “I feel so privileged to work for an organization that inspires so much enthusiasm in so many people and is so willing to devote time and energy to it. The team I work with is so passionate, it’s just a pleasure to work with.

Hartman does not live in Cincinnati. “I am an artist and I come from this perspective. One of the things I hope to bring to the festival is a more inclusive atmosphere.

To make the festival’s legendary after-parties more inviting, she moves them from the Know Theater’s underground bar to the outdoor parking lot just north of the theater with her vibrant “Looking Good” mural. It will become a beer garden with free daily programming on an outdoor stage. On weekends, parents and children can take part in a workshop, or adults can let the children play while they go to the theater to see an adult show.

“We’re going to have a lot of all-ages friendly stuff,” Hartman said.

“It’s important to me that everyone feels welcome at the Cincinnati Fringe, regardless of your background, your abilities, what you can bring to the table. Everyone has something to offer,” she continues. “I want everyone to be able to enjoy the festival, whether they can pay to see a show in an indoor venue or if they just want to enjoy our outdoor stage. Everyone is welcome!”

During the two weeks of the festival, there are 38 ticketed events, offering 177 performances in total. View all listings on CincyFringe.com.
Listed alphabetically below, find 12 Cincy Fringe shows to consider.

The identity of the barn is from storyteller and Cincy Fringe veteran Erika Kate MacDonald, who created this entertaining one-man show based on her obsession with collapsing barns. She will be joined by another Fringe favorite, guitarist and vocalist Paul Strickland. MacDonald is a traveling theater maker whose original works have been presented Off-Broadway and honored many times at fringe festivals across the United States and Canada.

be my thief from Queens’ Mac Rogers is a twisty single-player thriller about a man who believes a double has replaced his wife. The tale explores themes of post-pandemic anxiety, predatory capitalism, and the in-person return to work debate. Rogers is a former Cincy Fringe Award winner, and his Gideon Media has produced popular podcast thrillers.

twisted compass by Neil Brookshire of Egg Harbor, Wisconsin, is a one-man show based on interviews with a friend-turned-army medic. It details deployment and combat experiences in Iraq and how war can shape a person’s concept of what is normal. It also deals with trauma, mental health, recovery and relationships.

Change my major to Joan by Boris Dansberry of Philadelphia (originally from Newport, Kentucky) is inspired by the spirit of Joan of Arc. This eclectic presentation – described as a “medieval trans concert PPT” – explores the trials and tribulations of queer experience using humor, Nirvana, masks, George Bernard Shaw, beans and Friedrich Schiller with live music. from local power station Jess Lamb and The Factory.

Charlotte Van Helsing befriends a vampire, a crow, and (maybe) her father by Emily Borst (a graduate of Northern Kentucky University’s musical theater program) tells the story of a young woman who discovers that growing up might be a little more than she bargained for as she navigates the secrets and family expectations.

Destin, USA by Laura Anne Harris of Vancouver, Washington is a solo exhibition based on Harris’ 2016 experience as a relay operator for people who are deaf or hard of hearing after the presidential election. Residing in Donald Trump’s America, she explores the hidden humanity of the American people. The show uses captioned video performances by three deaf actors.

Father, Daughter and Holy Toast is by Barbara Brady of San Francisco (after more than 20 years in Cincinnati). It’s a humorous one-man show about being middle-aged, divorced, and living in her childhood home with her eccentric elderly father, who uses scientific workarounds to stay together. What must be sacrificed: the dignity of the father or the independence of the daughter? Brady has performed at Fringes in Orlando and Great Salt Lake.

Jinkies! from Cincinnati’s Queen City Flash follows a hit from 2019. It’s the next thrilling adventure in the life of a nosy teenage detective and her dog. Director Bridget Leak and playwright Trey Tatum specialize in bold stories told with irreverence. This one answers the question, “What if the Hardy Boys wanted to burn that shit?”

Word of Laertes by James Word of St. Louis is a first. Fans of the This American Life podcast might remember “Act V,” about a one-act production of Hamlet in a Missouri prison. Word played Laertes, and that changed his trajectory. He learned that he had acted all his life; he just didn’t know. Today, Word is a storyteller helping people understand that it’s never too late to change. “Crime is easy,” he says. “Hamlet is difficult.” This is the premiere of his show.

Sadec 1965: A love story is from Flora Le of Washington, DC. Learning that his ex-father has cancer, Le sets off on a six-week motorcycle trip through Vietnam to seek answers. It is characterized by the fact that Motorcycle Diaries meets Eat, Pray, Love. Le’s painful life experiences allow him to create beautiful stories of resilience, forgiveness, personal transcendence and love.

Texas Annie: Legend of the Moan Ranger by Cincinnatians Jennifer Howd and Maggie Perrino is a campy musical based on a Texas law banning the sale of sex toys. Overturned by an appeals court, the law still stands: you can legally own more guns than sex toys in the Lone Star State. The show imagines the adventures of a renegade dildo rider. Think Rocky Horror meets John Waters.

Wuthering: a musical on the moors by Cincinnatians Hannah Gregory and Caitlin McWethy is a folk musical adaptation of Emily Brontë’s novel in which Cathy and Heathcliff live as wild, uncontrollable Roman candles. Gregory and McWethy’s previous Fringe projects were award-winning Descent: a Murder Ballad and The Belle and Boone Helm.

Fringe fans should also keep an eye out for one-time special events, including True Theater (June 16), an evening of behind-the-scenes monologues sharing what it’s like to be a Fringe performer. Additionally, Kevin James Thornton, a storyteller and former Cincy Fringe favorite, will deliver a pair of evening performances (June 11-12) featuring material from his massive TikTok following that has garnered him over a billion views. .

The Cincy Fringe Festival runs June 3-18 at the Know Theater (1120 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine) and the Art Academy of Cincinnati. Single tickets start at $16, with options to further support artists. Passes are available. Information: www.cincyfringe.com.

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]]> ‘Groovy’ music can boost brain performance, study finds https://ringtonesdownload.net/groovy-music-can-boost-brain-performance-study-finds/ Mon, 30 May 2022 16:13:06 +0000 https://ringtonesdownload.net/groovy-music-can-boost-brain-performance-study-finds/ TSUKUBA, Japan — The right song can brighten up even the darkest day for many music fans, but new research from Japan reports that “groovy” music can even improve brain function! That’s right, dancing on your Saturday nights can just sharpen your thinking skills. Scientists at the University of Tsukuba report that “music with a […]]]>

TSUKUBA, Japan — The right song can brighten up even the darkest day for many music fans, but new research from Japan reports that “groovy” music can even improve brain function! That’s right, dancing on your Saturday nights can just sharpen your thinking skills.

Scientists at the University of Tsukuba report that “music with a groove” can significantly increase measures of executive function and related brain activity. There is a catch though: you need to be familiar with the melody.

The study authors explain that groovy music typically elicits feelings of pleasure while simultaneously increasing “behavioral arousal levels”. Previous studies have shown that exercise can help sharpen cognition, and the research team speculated that dancing to groovy music might benefit the brain in the same way.

However, no studies had formally investigated the influence of groovy beats on brain function. So the researchers decided to do the work themselves. Specifically, they set out to examine the impact of dance music on brain activity in neural areas associated with executive function, such as the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (l-DLPFC).

“Groove rhythms elicit groove feelings and positive affective responses. However, it is not known if they influence executive function,” Professor Hideaki Soya, lead author of the study, said in an academic statement. “As a result, in the present study, we performed brain imaging to assess corresponding changes in executive function and measured individual psychological responses to groove music.”

How do groovy tunes affect the brain?

To observe and assess executive brain function before and after listening to music, the research team used a brain imaging technique called functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), along with a word matching test of color. Participants also completed surveys examining their subjective experiences while listening to the groovy tunes.

“The results were surprising,” reports Professor Soya. “We found that groove rhythm improved executive function and activity in the l-DLPFC only in participants who reported that music elicited a strong groove feeling and a clear-headed feeling.”

These psychological responses to groove rhythms may even predict changes in executive function and l-DLPFC activity.

“Our results indicate that individual differences in psychological responses to groove music modulate corresponding effects on executive function. As such, the effects of groove rhythm on human cognitive performance may be mediated by familiarity or ability beat processing,” concludes Prof. Soya.

These results, although largely preliminary, have the potential to benefit countless people. From the retiree looking to stay mentally alert and stave off dementia, to workers and students hoping to improve their performance, throwing in a few catchy tunes can make a difference.

The study authors add that when we dance to upbeat music, it usually results in both positive mood and rhythmic synchronization. These two factors may partly explain the cognitive improvement observed in the subjects.

The findings appear in Scientific reports.

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