Ed Sheeran at Thomond Park, Limerick, FAQ: times, access and tickets

What are the Ed Sheeran concert times at Thomond Park, Limerick, Thursday and Friday?

Doors open at 4 p.m., with the first act (Denise Chaila) scheduled to take the stage around 6 p.m. Sheeran himself is expected on stage shortly after 8 p.m., with the show ending around 10:30 p.m.

The box office looks different than before?

Yes, as an anti-soliciting measure, there are no physical/paper tickets, so you cannot print them. Attendees must ‘unlock’ and download tickets to their smartphone via the Ticketmaster app.

Organizers have asked people to make sure they download their tickets before heading to the concert. Once unlocked by the booking manager, tickets can be transferred to other members of your party. Check that you are present on the correct day and make sure your phone is fully charged.

This may all sound a bit new, but in Cork and Dublin the stewards were very helpful and seemed to take a common sense approach to it all.

Ticketmaster tips to unlock your ticket for Ed Sheeran.

Will there be road closures?

Some roads around the stadium will be closed each day, mainly from 2 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. These include parts of Ennis Road, Shelbourne Road Upper, Old Cratloe Road and Kileely Road. Some areas in the region will also be closed to the public.

Parking and transport services to Thomond Park, operated by Hynan Travel, depart from Chawkes service station, Castletroy; and the Radisson Blu Hotel, Ennis Road.

Can I bring a bag?

Only a tiny one. Organizers say no bags larger than A4 will be allowed on site. Other usual restrictions are in place on what you can bring into the stadium.

Food and drink?

Food and drinks will be available inside the stadium. ID will be required to purchase alcohol. Prices are for the standard stadium. Merchandising stands will offer Ed Sheeran gear, along with t-shirts (€30) and other memorabilia.

If you are in the stands, can you go out into the field?

Afraid not. You will need to stay in the general area your ticket corresponds to.

Who are the acts of support?

Limerick rapper Denise Chaila backs Ed Sheeran at Thomond, coming on stage at 6pm.  Photo: Eddie O’Hare
Limerick rapper Denise Chaila backs Ed Sheeran at Thomond, coming on stage at 6pm. Photo: Eddie O’Hare

Denise Chaila makes a triumphant return to her hometown with fellow rappers Murli and GodKnows. Widely tipped to be one of Ireland’s stars this year, she’s a brilliant performer, and hopefully there’ll be a decent crowd early to watch her perform. Maisie Peters is a 21-year-old English singer-songwriter who Sheeran signed to his own label.

What can we expect from the man himself?

About 24 songs over 140 minutes. Most are from his five albums, but the Cork and Dublin gigs also featured two other tracks: the traditional song The Parting Glass and Love Yourself, the hit he wrote for Justin Bieber. Unsurprisingly, Galway Girl and Shape of You were among the big singles in Dublin and Cork. Sheeran also has a band with him this time around, but for most of the set it will still be just Ed, his guitar and his effects pedals.

  Ed Sheeran's circular stage allows more people to get closer to the show.  Photo: Eddie O’Hare
Ed Sheeran’s circular stage allows more people to get closer to the show. Photo: Eddie O’Hare

The stage is a different setup from previous stadium concerts. Located in the center of the pitch, it is round, with huge curved screens so everyone has a good view. It also spins.

What should you wear?

It’s an outdoor gig, so you might want to lean towards practicality rather than high fashion style. Don’t let the balmy daytime temperatures fool you – by the time the concert is in full swing, it can get quite chilly. A few showers are expected over the next few days, but so far the concert windows look pretty clear.

Also, you’ll have to walk a bit to get to the stadium, so maybe skip the high heels until the after party.

Another pro tip?

Time your bathroom breaks carefully, especially if you are with children. It will be almost impossible to go to the toilets at the end of the concert.

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